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Transitioning Your Cat From Dry Food to Wet Food

transitioning your cat from dry food to wet food

Cats are creatures of habit and making any type of significant change can be tricky. Making a food change requires extra care because of the potential health complications that can occur if done incorrectly or abruptly.

Why Would You Make a Change to Wet  Cat Food?

There are many reasons why you might want or need to make this change:

 

Wet food contains more protein and fewer carbohydrates than dry food and that’s a more natural diet for a cat.

Wet food also has a significantly higher water content and that can be a helpful factor in avoiding urinary issues.

Wet food is often viewed as more palatable by cats.

Your veterinarian may have put your cat on a prescription formula food that only comes in wet form.

 

Before Making the Change From Dry Cat Food

Unless your veterinarian has prescribed a specific formula or brand of food, take time to research which food would be best for your cat. Seek your veterinarian’s advice regarding various brands and also spend time in your local pet product store in order to read labels and becomes educated about what’s in the food you’re considering offering to your cat.

Quote from Beth Stern

 

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Keep in mind that cats are obligate carnivores so when you read cat food labels pay attention to the order of how ingredients are listed on the side of the can. You want to see good quality protein sources listed first.

A Gradual Transition For Your Cat

Even if you’re going to change your cat over to the best quality wet food from a bargain basement dry food, it’s important that you not rush. Don’t take the attitude that your cat will eat when she gets hungry enough because that can result in a potentially life-threatening situation for your cat. Hepatic lipidosis is a life-threatening liver condition that can develop when a cat goes without eating for more than 24 hours. Even if your cat eats a small amount of food, it may not be enough to prevent her from hepatic lipidosis.